redwhiteblack

baynulharmayn:

Ayatollah Bahjat

baynulharmayn:

Ayatollah Bahjat

(Source: baynalharamain)

baynulharmayn:

Imam Ruhullah Khomeini

baynulharmayn:

Imam Ruhullah Khomeini

(Source: baynalharamain)

9gag:

This is why I’m scared of ocean

9gag:

This is why I’m scared of ocean

(via alouph)

Interesting discussion on Australian Television:

Religion, faith & love

silly-nanners:

Teenagers react on the first day of class without their martyred classmate, Amer Nasser. 
17 year old Palestinian Amer Nassar was shot dead by Israeli Occupation forces during clashes in Tulkarem that erupted over the death of Palestinian prisoner Maysara abu Hamdia. (April 3, 2013).

silly-nanners:

Teenagers react on the first day of class without their martyred classmate, Amer Nasser. 


17 year old Palestinian Amer Nassar was shot dead by Israeli Occupation forces during clashes in Tulkarem that erupted over the death of Palestinian prisoner Maysara abu Hamdia. (April 3, 2013).

(Source: nannerlies, via thepeacefulterrorist)

kumayl-abbas:

MUST READ THE BELOW ARGUMENT BTW A STUDENT AND A PROFESSOR. ~WHAT IS FAITH! Professor : You are a Christian, aren’t you, son ?
Student : Yes, sir.Professor: So, you believe in GOD ?Student : Absolutely, sir.Professor : Is GOD good ?Student : Sure.Professor: Is GOD all powerful ?Student : Yes.Professor: My brother died of cancer even though he prayed to GOD to heal him. Most of us would attempt to help others who are ill. But GOD didn’t. How is this GOD good then? Hmm?(Student was silent.)Professor: You can’t answer, can you ? Let’s start again, young fella. Is GOD good?Student : Yes.Professor: Is satan good ?Student : No.Professor: Where does satan come from ?Student : From … GOD …Professor: That’s right. Tell me son, is there evil in this world?Student : Yes.Professor: Evil is everywhere, isn’t it ? And GOD did make everything. Correct?Student : Yes.Professor: So who created evil ?(Student did not answer.)Professor: Is there sickness? Immorality? Hatred? Ugliness? All these terrible things exist in the world, don’t they?Student : Yes, sir.Professor: So, who created them ?(Student had no answer.)Professor: Science says you have 5 Senses you use to identify and observe the world around you. Tell me, son, have you ever seen GOD?Student : No, sir.Professor: Tell us if you have ever heard your GOD?Student : No , sir.Professor: Have you ever felt your GOD, tasted your GOD, smelt your GOD? Have you ever had any sensory perception of GOD for that matter?Student : No, sir. I’m afraid I haven’t.Professor: Yet you still believe in Him?Student : Yes.Professor : According to Empirical, Testable, Demonstrable Protocol, Science says your GOD doesn’t exist. What do you say to that, son?Student : Nothing. I only have my faith.Professor: Yes, faith. And that is the problem Science has.Student : Professor, is there such a thing as heat?Professor: Yes.Student : And is there such a thing as cold?Professor: Yes.Student : No, sir. There isn’t.(The lecture theater became very quiet with this turn of events.)Student : Sir, you can have lots of heat, even more heat, superheat, mega heat, white heat, a little heat or no heat. But we don’t have anything called cold. We can hit 458 degrees below zero which is no heat, but we can’t go any further after that. There is no such thing as cold. Cold is only a word we use to describe the absence of heat. We cannot measure cold. Heat is energy. Cold is not the opposite of heat, sir, just the absence of it.(There was pin-drop silence in the lecture theater.)Student : What about darkness, Professor? Is there such a thing as darkness?Professor: Yes. What is night if there isn’t darkness?Student : You’re wrong again, sir. Darkness is the absence of something. You can have low light, normal light, bright light, flashing light. But if you have no light constantly, you have nothing and its called darkness, isn’t it? In reality, darkness isn’t. If it is, well you would be able to make darkness darker, wouldn’t you?Professor: So what is the point you are making, young man ?Student : Sir, my point is your philosophical premise is flawed.Professor: Flawed ? Can you explain how?Student : Sir, you are working on the premise of duality. You argue there is life and then there is death, a good GOD and a bad GOD. You are viewing the concept of GOD as something finite, something we can measure. Sir, Science can’t even explain a thought. It uses electricity and magnetism, but has never seen, much less fully understood either one. To view death as the opposite of life is to be ignorant of the fact that death cannot exist as a substantive thing.Death is not the opposite of life: just the absence of it. Now tell me, Professor, do you teach your students that they evolved from a monkey?Professor: If you are referring to the natural evolutionary process, yes, of course, I do.Student : Have you ever observed evolution with your own eyes, sir?(The Professor shook his head with a smile, beginning to realize where the argument was going.)Student : Since no one has ever observed the process of evolution at work and cannot even prove that this process is an on-going endeavor. Are you not teaching your opinion, sir? Are you not a scientist but a preacher?(The class was in uproar.)Student : Is there anyone in the class who has ever seen the Professor’s brain?(The class broke out into laughter. )Student : Is there anyone here who has ever heard the Professor’s brain, felt it, touched or smelt it? No one appears to have done so. So, according to the established Rules of Empirical, Stable, Demonstrable Protocol, Science says that you have no brain, sir. With all due respect, sir, how do we then trust your lectures, sir?(The room was silent. The Professor stared at the student, his face unfathomable.)Professor: I guess you’ll have to take them on faith, son.Student : That is it sir … Exactly ! The link between man & GOD is FAITH. That is all that keeps things alive and moving.P.S.I believe you have enjoyed the conversation. And if so, you’ll probably want your friends / colleagues to enjoy the same, won’t you?Forward this to increase their knowledge … or FAITH.By the way, that student was EINSTEIN.

kumayl-abbas:

MUST READ THE BELOW ARGUMENT BTW A STUDENT AND A PROFESSOR. ~WHAT IS FAITH!

 
Professor : You are a Christian, aren’t you, son ?


Student : Yes, sir.

Professor: So, you believe in GOD ?

Student : Absolutely, sir.

Professor : Is GOD good ?

Student : Sure.

Professor: Is GOD all powerful ?

Student : Yes.

Professor: My brother died of cancer even though he prayed to GOD to heal him. Most of us would attempt to help others who are ill. But GOD didn’t. How is this GOD good then? Hmm?

(Student was silent.)

Professor: You can’t answer, can you ? Let’s start again, young fella. Is GOD good?

Student : Yes.

Professor: Is satan good ?

Student : No.

Professor: Where does satan come from ?

Student : From … GOD …

Professor: That’s right. Tell me son, is there evil in this world?

Student : Yes.

Professor: Evil is everywhere, isn’t it ? And GOD did make everything. Correct?

Student : Yes.

Professor: So who created evil ?

(Student did not answer.)

Professor: Is there sickness? Immorality? Hatred? Ugliness? All these terrible things exist in the world, don’t they?

Student : Yes, sir.

Professor: So, who created them ?

(Student had no answer.)

Professor: Science says you have 5 Senses you use to identify and observe the world around you. Tell me, son, have you ever seen GOD?

Student : No, sir.

Professor: Tell us if you have ever heard your GOD?

Student : No , sir.

Professor: Have you ever felt your GOD, tasted your GOD, smelt your GOD? Have you ever had any sensory perception of GOD for that matter?

Student : No, sir. I’m afraid I haven’t.

Professor: Yet you still believe in Him?

Student : Yes.

Professor : According to Empirical, Testable, Demonstrable Protocol, Science says your GOD doesn’t exist. What do you say to that, son?

Student : Nothing. I only have my faith.

Professor: Yes, faith. And that is the problem Science has.

Student : Professor, is there such a thing as heat?

Professor: Yes.

Student : And is there such a thing as cold?

Professor: Yes.

Student : No, sir. There isn’t.

(The lecture theater became very quiet with this turn of events.)

Student : Sir, you can have lots of heat, even more heat, superheat, mega heat, white heat, a little heat or no heat. But we don’t have anything called cold. We can hit 458 degrees below zero which is no heat, but we can’t go any further after that. There is no such thing as cold. Cold is only a word we use to describe the absence of heat. We cannot measure cold. Heat is energy. Cold is not the opposite of heat, sir, just the absence of it.

(There was pin-drop silence in the lecture theater.)

Student : What about darkness, Professor? Is there such a thing as darkness?

Professor: Yes. What is night if there isn’t darkness?

Student : You’re wrong again, sir. Darkness is the absence of something. You can have low light, normal light, bright light, flashing light. But if you have no light constantly, you have nothing and its called darkness, isn’t it? In reality, darkness isn’t. If it is, well you would be able to make darkness darker, wouldn’t you?

Professor: So what is the point you are making, young man ?

Student : Sir, my point is your philosophical premise is flawed.

Professor: Flawed ? Can you explain how?

Student : Sir, you are working on the premise of duality. You argue there is life and then there is death, a good GOD and a bad GOD. You are viewing the concept of GOD as something finite, something we can measure. Sir, Science can’t even explain a thought. It uses electricity and magnetism, but has never seen, much less fully understood either one. To view death as the opposite of life is to be ignorant of the fact that death cannot exist as a substantive thing.

Death is not the opposite of life: just the absence of it. Now tell me, Professor, do you teach your students that they evolved from a monkey?

Professor: If you are referring to the natural evolutionary process, yes, of course, I do.

Student : Have you ever observed evolution with your own eyes, sir?

(The Professor shook his head with a smile, beginning to realize where the argument was going.)

Student : Since no one has ever observed the process of evolution at work and cannot even prove that this process is an on-going endeavor. Are you not teaching your opinion, sir? Are you not a scientist but a preacher?

(The class was in uproar.)

Student : Is there anyone in the class who has ever seen the Professor’s brain?

(The class broke out into laughter. )

Student : Is there anyone here who has ever heard the Professor’s brain, felt it, touched or smelt it? No one appears to have done so. So, according to the established Rules of Empirical, Stable, Demonstrable Protocol, Science says that you have no brain, sir. With all due respect, sir, how do we then trust your lectures, sir?

(The room was silent. The Professor stared at the student, his face unfathomable.)

Professor: I guess you’ll have to take them on faith, son.

Student : That is it sir … Exactly ! The link between man & GOD is FAITH. That is all that keeps things alive and moving.

P.S.

I believe you have enjoyed the conversation. And if so, you’ll probably want your friends / colleagues to enjoy the same, won’t you?

Forward this to increase their knowledge … or FAITH.

By the way, that student was EINSTEIN.

Press TV: ‘Anonymous’ vows to wipe Israel off cyberspace

presstvchannel:

image

Israeli websites have come under massive cyber attacks in solidarity with Palestinians following a warning by the hacker group Anonymous that threatened to ‘erase’ Israel from the internet.



Websites including the sites owned by the Bank of Israel, Tax Authority, and the Central Bureau of…

(Source: presstv.ir)

freedominlibya:

anrawrasaurus:

thepeacefulterrorist:

Alaa Murabit on Fighting for Women in Libya
Alaa Murabit is not afraid.
The 23-year-old Libyan activist told 60 Minutes’s Lesley Stahl onstage on day 2 of the 2013 Women in the World Summit that other vocal women have been attacked by militias in her country. But the support of her family and community members—both male and female—motivates her to keep fighting for the rights of Libyan women in the face of whatever threats that mission may invite, she said.
Murabit is the president and founder of the Voice of Libyan Women (VLW), an organization created in the wake of the 2011 Libyan uprising to advocate for the rights of women in a postrevolutionary Libya. A recent medical school graduate, Murabit was raised in Canada and moved back to her parents’ native home of Zawia, Libya, at 15. When the revolution began in 2011, Zawia was one of the first cities in western Libya to rise up.
Murabit’s father, a doctor, became heavily involved in the initial movement, and she joined him in providing health care for rebel soldiers, often at pro-regime hospitals. Their work put them on the regime’s radar. Her father was hunted and even arrested a few times, and she was put on Libya’s list of most wanted women—because, as she explained to a roar of applause Friday, “I have a very big mouth and I don’t know how to keep my opinions to myself.”
“During the revolution, I saw phenomenally brave women taking a leading role,” Murabit recalled. “A lot of people say they were supportive, but I dislike that term. They were a foundation and they deserve the ability—following the revolution—to be a foundation in politics.” That is the focus of Murabit’s organization: to ensure that the women who put their lives on the line to fight for their country’s freedom can have a say in its future.
A large part of empowering Libyan women is battling the pervasive culture of domestic violence. A unique way to do that, Murabit has discovered, is to educate women on the preachings of their own religion. One of VLW’s anti-domestic-violence initiatives is hosting seminars focused on verses from the Quran and other Muslim scriptures, to create a dialogue through the lens of religion—an integral part of Libyan society. “Often when violence happens, people excuse it with religion,” Murabit said. “Young girls need to know that they can fight fire with fire and say, ‘No, my religion is not why you are doing this.’”
Murabit took a few days off between her graduation from medical school and her upcoming medical exams to speak at the Women in the World Summit, but school isn’t the only thing on her mind. Libya is gearing up to write a new constitution, and Murabit is concerned about how the constitutional committee will be chosen and who, exactly, will be on it. “It is the job of women’s rights groups, the media, and human rights groups to demand that not only women are involved but that minorities are involved,” she said. “Civil society, for 42 years, has not existed in Libya. We are very behind.”
Stahl closed out the interview by wishing Murabit good luck on her exams and telling her, wholeheartedly, “We gain more from you coming here than you do.”

Libya!

Represeeenta Alaa!

freedominlibya:

anrawrasaurus:

thepeacefulterrorist:

Alaa Murabit on Fighting for Women in Libya

Alaa Murabit is not afraid.

The 23-year-old Libyan activist told 60 Minutes’s Lesley Stahl onstage on day 2 of the 2013 Women in the World Summit that other vocal women have been attacked by militias in her country. But the support of her family and community members—both male and female—motivates her to keep fighting for the rights of Libyan women in the face of whatever threats that mission may invite, she said.

Murabit is the president and founder of the Voice of Libyan Women (VLW), an organization created in the wake of the 2011 Libyan uprising to advocate for the rights of women in a postrevolutionary Libya. A recent medical school graduate, Murabit was raised in Canada and moved back to her parents’ native home of Zawia, Libya, at 15. When the revolution began in 2011, Zawia was one of the first cities in western Libya to rise up.

Murabit’s father, a doctor, became heavily involved in the initial movement, and she joined him in providing health care for rebel soldiers, often at pro-regime hospitals. Their work put them on the regime’s radar. Her father was hunted and even arrested a few times, and she was put on Libya’s list of most wanted women—because, as she explained to a roar of applause Friday, “I have a very big mouth and I don’t know how to keep my opinions to myself.”

“During the revolution, I saw phenomenally brave women taking a leading role,” Murabit recalled. “A lot of people say they were supportive, but I dislike that term. They were a foundation and they deserve the ability—following the revolution—to be a foundation in politics.” That is the focus of Murabit’s organization: to ensure that the women who put their lives on the line to fight for their country’s freedom can have a say in its future.

A large part of empowering Libyan women is battling the pervasive culture of domestic violence. A unique way to do that, Murabit has discovered, is to educate women on the preachings of their own religion. One of VLW’s anti-domestic-violence initiatives is hosting seminars focused on verses from the Quran and other Muslim scriptures, to create a dialogue through the lens of religion—an integral part of Libyan society. “Often when violence happens, people excuse it with religion,” Murabit said. “Young girls need to know that they can fight fire with fire and say, ‘No, my religion is not why you are doing this.’”

Murabit took a few days off between her graduation from medical school and her upcoming medical exams to speak at the Women in the World Summit, but school isn’t the only thing on her mind. Libya is gearing up to write a new constitution, and Murabit is concerned about how the constitutional committee will be chosen and who, exactly, will be on it. “It is the job of women’s rights groups, the media, and human rights groups to demand that not only women are involved but that minorities are involved,” she said. “Civil society, for 42 years, has not existed in Libya. We are very behind.”

Stahl closed out the interview by wishing Murabit good luck on her exams and telling her, wholeheartedly, “We gain more from you coming here than you do.”

Libya!

Represeeenta Alaa!

(via yamesmooma)

Malka e Shan: gowns: lower-income people tend to be “hoarders” and richer people are...

gowns:

lower-income people tend to be “hoarders” and richer people are able to do more “minimalist” living spaces. if u don’t have much, you will hold onto any little thing that comes across your way. you got a new tv, but you still keep the old tv because you know things can break. you…

shemspenguin:

Imam Ali (as) wrote to Salman al Farsi (ra) : To continue, surely, the likeness of this world is that of a snake: it is soft to touch, and deadly poisonous. The ignorant child is distracted by it, and the one with understanding and intellect is cautious of it. So turn away from what fascinates you in it, for how little of it stays with you.
Imam Ali Ibn abi Talib (as)

How can anyone tell me that this man isn’t the successor of Prophet Mohamed (saw)?

(via fil7aqiqa-deactivated20131023)

shemspenguin:

The intellect is better than desire, for the intellect makes you a king over your destiny, and desire makes you a slave of your destiny.
Imam Ali Ibn Abi Talib (as)

I’m mind blown, everything this beautiful man says is just wow. He never fails to amaze me. To read more: http://www.shia.org/sayings.html

“Beware of yourself, when the energy that moves you in life is actually the ego’s energy, but has found a religious form of expression. That’s the most dangerous thing of all”

—   Abdal Hakim Murad (via studentofjafar)

(via 313-hopeful)

“Nothing in this world is really useful to you unless it has some utility and value for you for the next world. If you at all want to lament over things which you have lost in this world then worry about the loss of things which had immortal values for you.”

—   Imam Ali (a)

(Source: yaseeneducation, via industrialcracks)

“All those “How’s it goings?” that we exchange give the impression of a society composed of patients taking each other’s temperature. Sociability is now made up of a thousand little niches, a thousand little refuges where you can take shelter. Where it’s always better than the bitter cold outside. Where everything’s false, since it’s all just a pretext for getting warmed up. Where nothing can happen since we’re all too busy shivering silently together. Soon this society will be held together by the mere tension of all the social atoms straining toward an illusory cure. It’s a power plant that runs its turbines on a gigantic reservoir of unwept tears, always on the verge of spilling over.”

—   The Invisible Committee, The Coming Insurrection (via blunderbussmag)

(via shiamuslim-deactivated20131203)